Public Comment
Submitted comments must be approved first and will be viewable within a few days. Comments do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the COGCC, the State of Colorado, or any associated agencies. Due to the volume of comments received the Commission cannot respond individually to every comment.

Selected Well / Location:
Doc NumForm TypeOperatorOp NumberWell / Location NameLocationCounty
40264322002A CRESTONE PEAK RESOURCES OPERATING LLC 10633Cosslett East 22H-H168SENE 22-1N-68WWELD

 

The public comment period has passed for this Location

        
          
     
                 
   
 

     

Comments Received
Subject: Cosslett East 22H-H168 application
SURPRISE PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT LLC PUBLIC COMMENT TO CRESTONE COSSLETT EAST OGDP APPLICATION Surprise Property Development LLC (“Surprise”) is the surface owner of the property that is adjacent to and directly south of the proposed Cosslett East OGDP (“Well Site”). Surprise chose to intervene in Crestone’s (“Crestone”) application for a 1041 WOGLA Permit with Weld County for the Well Site. As was the case with Crestone’s application to Weld County for the 1041 WOGLA Permit, Crestone mailed a packet to Surprise has AGAIN used an aerial photo for its filings with the State that fails to show Surprise’s adjacent business development and current land use. Weld County required Crestone to submit an updated aerial photo depicting current land uses within the buffer zones. We are attaching as Exhibit A, the drawing that Crestone provided to Surprise and Weld County at the Weld County’s request. As you can see after reviewing Exhibit A, all of Surprise’s business uses fall within what Crestone calls out as ‘1,000’ Disturbance Buffer’. Currently, over 75 RVs and boats are stored within the proposed ‘500’ Equipment Buffer’. One could possibly assume that Crestone is intentionally being deceptive and trying to depict the Well Site as being surrounded by farm land. Why cannot Crestone be an honest applicant with this information and submit updated aerial photos? This raises the question of accuracy with the remaining information included within the application: for example, should we be concerned that Crestone has not accurately studied and disclosed potential adverse health impacts that may occur for people that occupy commercial buildings within the buffer zones? Since May 2020, Surprise has been operating our 32-acre RV and boat storage facility on our property. Our facility uses include a perimeter fence, entrance gate, office building, lighting, fire hydrants, multiple outbuildings, and most importantly, has over 600 RVs and boats currently stored on site. The office, which required a building permit from Weld County, is staffed 7 days a week, with business hours generally being 9 am to 5 pm. Our employees, as well as, customers occupy the office and storage area. We have attached a drone photo taken in June of 2020 about a week after we opened the storage yard which shows the improvements listed above as Exhibit B Surprise would like COGCC to stipulate that these proposed wells do not preclude Surprise’s ongoing business operations as to any current rule/regulation of COGCC. If the COGCC is unwilling to do so, we ask that our comments be put into the public record and this application be denied as submitted. In general, it seems like good public policy to encourage oil and gas operators to overlap these regulatory buffers zones as much as possible to accommodate surface owners who are worried about regulatory impacts caused by oil and gas operations (such as the buffers) on their ongoing and future business operations. The COGCC Information Sheet: Procedural Steps for the Commission’s Review of OGDP’s: What are the procedural steps involved with the Director’s and Commission’s review of Oil and Gas Development Plans? 4.b states that the Director will review alternative site locations. We would ask that the Director consider having Crestone move these wells to the north and west, closer to the existing wells on the Orr property, so that the wells’ regulatory buffers overlap as much as possible with the wells already drilled on the “Location ID: 332117”. Please send me an email and I can send the entire packet with Exhibits back.
Comment Date:6/20/2022 6:57:01 PM
Subject: Do not expand
Please do not pursue this project. I am raising two young children in Erie and I want them to live in a town that prioritizes public health and safety. The proposed sites are close to where my children will go to high school. Until companies are held accountable for spills or clean up, I do not support increasing the number of wells in or around Erie.
Comment Date:6/21/2022 3:57:50 PM
Subject: Deny Cosslet East Pad Permit
To members of the committee: I deeply oppose Cosslet East Pad project. I, like many of us, am grieving what we've already lost and are losing from environmental degradation and climate change in this state. This plan is a greedy money grab that will only serve to further destroy the future of Colorado. As a committee, you are required by law to protect our collective future, including our public health, safety, and welfare. As a Denver resident I am already regularly experiencing extreme ozone pollution, wildfire smoke pollution, and heat waves from climate change as a result of oil and gas production. The Cosslet East Pad will only worsen these circumstances in this state I love so dearly. Approving this plan will not help Colorado reach its goal of emissions reductions of 90% by 2050. If we miss this critical goal because of your negligence, what will be said of your legacy? The International Energy Agency and the UN Environment Programme have said we need no new oil and gas development if we are going to keep global warming under 1.5 degrees Celsius. Do not approve this permit. Sincerely, Rebecca Smith
Comment Date:6/20/2022 4:35:31 PM
Subject: Please Don’t Do This
This Project is killing us !!!
Comment Date:6/21/2022 5:02:10 PM
Subject: Cumulitive Impact
This project is not acceptable under the cumulative impact guidelines in SB19-181, too much impact in this area already from other projects on air quality, and too much density of existing infrastructure. Population density of the area ensures that, should this project exist, the impact to the residents, human and otherwise would be poorly impacted.
Comment Date:6/20/2022 3:24:31 PM
Subject: Be comprehensive and responsible
Before you approve new wells anywhere, including of course the proposed Crestone wells, it is your duty to look at the situation as a whole: What else is going on in that area in terms of pollution? What would these wells add to that? Do your job. Keep the people of Erie safe!
Comment Date:6/20/2022 9:48:14 PM
Subject: Do Not Approve
I am asking that these wells are not approved. In Erie and in my area, Colliers Hill, we are already dealing with air quality issues and spillages. To have 17 wells located so close to Soaring Heights PK-8 and Erie HS is unacceptable to expose our future generation to poor air quality. Our road infrastructure cannot support more 18 wheeler trucks causing the roads to buckle. Please keep this out of our area and the future housing that is planned.
Comment Date:6/22/2022 10:15:02 PM
Subject: Please Don’t Do This
This Project is killing us !!!
Comment Date:6/21/2022 5:02:02 PM
Subject: Deny Cosslett East
The Cosslett East location will have a significant negative impact on residents in Erie; the three mile wellbores will require increased drilling time and higher pressures, resulting in increased risks of fire, explosions, and injury. It will also consume resources that our drought ridden state cannot afford to lose. Crestone Peak Resources used 175,534,674 gallons of water to frack the twelve wells at the original Cosslett pad in Erie. It is estimated that almost 300 million gallons of water will be permanently poisoned to frack the 19 wells. The cumulative impacts of drilling additional wells in this overburdened area have not been sufficiently addressed. The Denver Metro/Northern Front Range area has been designated a severe nonattainment for ground-level ozone, of which oil and gas extraction is a known major contributor. Per the EPA Environmental Justice Screening and Mapping Tool, this region is at the 95th - 100th percentile for 2017 Air Toxic Cancer Risk and the same for Air Toxics Respiratory hazard index. Oil and gas production releases carcinogenic VOCs into our air, exacerbating cancer and other environmental risks. With hundreds of nearby wells, including large-scale pads including Mae J, Hammer, Cosslett, Windsock, and Coyote Trails, the COGCC must do more to address the issue of cumulative impacts. The recent Broomfield Health Survey demonstrated that respondents living within 1 mile of unconventional oil and gas development (UOGD) reported significantly greater frequencies of upper respiratory and acute symptoms than respondents living more than 2 miles from UOGD sites. Other studies, such as the one published in JAMA, support these findings. Given the planned residential and commercial development in this area, allowing yet another large-scale extractive operation is not a compatible use.
Comment Date:6/21/2022 9:22:54 PM
Subject: Please Do Not Approve
The density of BETX burners incinerating carcinogenic waste in the Erie Co area is already above acceptable levels for public health. This area ( the proposed site is West of I-25, not East as stated) is surrounded with existing residences and is slated for further residential and commercial development in the near future. The area is unsuited to heavy industrial mineral extraction and the noise, air and ground pollution associated with drilling and fracking operations. The very real hazards associated with a well blowout alone are reason enough to preclude operations in heavily populated and developing areas. Erie is already negatively impacted by this invasive and unhealthy industry, please do not allow this project to proceed.
Comment Date:6/21/2022 11:35:01 AM
Subject: Do Not Approve
Commissioners, The 17 wells proposed for this Crestone/Civitas plan are not far from Erie high school & Soaring Heights PreK-8. There is a lot of residential building going on nearby and there are already concerns about the existing well pads and emissions exposure and spills and noise around those homes and neighborhoods/communities that it really hinders the growth of Erie and the desirability of the town if people have to move next to something that can be detrimental to their health. We already have hundreds of wells in Erie, and our air quality data is alarming. We have legacy spills and leaking wells that have gone unremediated for nearly 1 year after discovery (State 30-6) and yet you want to allow 17 more wells to be drilled? Please do not allow any more wells in our Town.
Comment Date:6/17/2022 11:44:09 AM
Subject: drilling outside of city but close to schools
To the Commissioners that are bound by law to protect people before oil and gas interests, Please reject approval for this project by Crestone Peak as it will contribute to the emissions existing oil and gas operations create already in the close proximity. Erie has high density of wells and to place the new project just outside of municipal borders does not change the detrimental effects the industry has on the environment; the air does not know boundaries, nor does water, soil and peoples health. We have similar problems here in Greeley when a large Oil and Gas operation was approved close to Bella Romero Academy, just outside of the city, approved by the Weld County Commissioners (and of course by then the COGCC under the old rule of fostering oil and gas development…). Occasional air monitoring has shown high levels of toxic chemicals present and as you know, those findings are bad news for young people more so than for older ones. Please protect our youth from this harmful industry where ever you can. We have to. It is the law. Sincerely Jutta Seeger in Greeley, CO
Comment Date:6/20/2022 8:52:30 PM
Subject: 402643220
Please do not allow oil companies to place more wells closer than 2000 feet from schools, senior living, recreation centers, and residences/businesses. New studies show that there is harm even over 2000 feet. I live in a city surrounded by O&G and have experienced so many ozone days that it's hard to go outside. When we moved to Greeley in 1988, the weather was great-blue skies and clear sight to mountains--not so today. This pollution leads to early deaths for seniors and is harmful to pregnant mothers. Enough is enough. Move wells away from inhabited areas. As it is, the state needs to consider the cumulative effect of additional wells.
Comment Date:6/21/2022 11:34:51 AM
Subject: DO NOT APPROVE
As a parent of elementary school children who attend Soaring Heights, an Erie resident, and lover of the environment, I ask you to stand against and prevent the Cosslett East fracking project from moving forward in unincorporated Weld Country between Erie and Broomfield. PEOPLE and the environment in which we live should come first. There is no reason an industry raking in record profits to deliver shareholder value needs even more wells in our backyards—they have the money to take it elsewhere, and you should force them to do so. This is an industry that also enjoys plenty of taxpayer-funded benefits – see the $15 billion in direct federal subsidies they receive every year, and the $8.2 billion CARES Act they received in 2020. The costs to our families are far too high already, and you should not help them rob us of our air, water, and natural surroundings too, nor should we tolerate the risk to our children who attend school right down the street. And, from an economic perspective, why don't we start looking ahead to commercial development of the future, not oil and gas? Again, I ask you to stand against and prevent the Cosslett East fracking project from moving forward in unincorporated Weld Country between Erie and Broomfield.
Comment Date:6/20/2022 3:56:14 PM
Subject: Please don’t allow this permit
Dear commissioners, These additional 17 wells will impact residents of erie for the next 20 years. I have lived thru the fracking and flow back of nearby wells, and it is awful. Not to mention, as a resident of Erie, I receive notifications about legacy spills that go unremediated for months and months. Wells will inevitably spill. 100s of thousands of gallons of water are needed to frack wells. Please don’t allow this wasting of precious water.
Comment Date:6/20/2022 2:58:25 PM
Subject: Comments on Cosslett East Form 2A
Please find comments from Erie Exchange, LLC attached.
Comment Date:6/21/2022 11:48:59 PM
Subject: DO NOT APPROVE
I urge you to STOP (do not approve of) the Cosslett East fracking project from moving forward in unincorporated Weld Country between Erie and Broomfield. The proposed area is much too close to residential and school properties, and I’m growing increasingly concerned about protecting the value of my home as these wells are both an eyesore and give prospective buyers a reason to RUN from Erie—most would not choose to live near a well that’s harming the air they breathe, the water they drink and the quality of life they won't enjoy with that kind of noise nearby. Please consider the health and wellbeing of Erie residents, financial, physical, and mental, and tell big oil and gas to scram. I urge you to STOP the Cosslett East fracking project from moving forward. Thank you.
Comment Date:6/20/2022 4:06:53 PM
Subject: Keep Fracking Away from our Neighborhoods and Schools
The proposed Crestone/Civitas Cosslett expansion presents an unacceptable risk to families in Erie, Dacono and the surrounding area. Our air quality is already some of the worst in the country. This new/expanded operation, if approved, would put 17 new wells close enough to existing neighborhoods to present a major health risk to our community. There are several existing and new housing developments well within the 1-2 mile radius that numerous studies have shown are adversely impacted by these operations. We cannot continue to put profit margins above the health and safety of our area residents. The new wells would also pose a risk to waterways vital to agricultural operations throughout Weld County. I urge the commission to oppose this application. Thank you.
Comment Date:6/20/2022 3:51:06 PM
Subject: Comments of Behalf of the Town of Erie relating to the Cosslett East 22H-H168 Form 2A Submission
Dear Commissioners, As the Local Government Designee for the Town of Erie, Erie would like to provide the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) with the following comments to Crestone Peak Resources Operating LLC/Civitas Resources (Crestone) [Operator Number 10633] Form 2A [Document Number 402643220] permits for wells in unincorporated Weld County (Cosslett East 22H-H168 Location) on which notice was issued for the comment period ending on June 21, 2022, by the COGCC. 2018 Operator Agreement Between Erie and Crestone On November 4, 2018, Crestone and Erie entered into an Amended and Restated Operator Agreement (Agreement), which is attached to this letter for review by COGCC. The Agreement includes several best management practices (BMPs) [Appendix A] as well as other conditions which must be met for all proposed Crestone operations within the Operator Agreement Area [Appendix B]. Crestone agreed that the BMPs in Appendix A will apply to site such as Cosslett East that are within the Operator Agreement Area even if the site is not located within Town limits. Per the COGCC definition of a Relevant Local Government, “Relevant Local Government means a Local Government with land use authority where existing or proposed Oil and Gas Operations occur,” and by virtue of the 2018 Operator Agreement we have “land use authority” over the site and are a relevant local government in addition to a proximate local government. Therefore, Erie requests that Crestone submit the 302.b certification with respect to Erie’s authority. Erie requests that COGCC review and consider the conditions and BMPs as provided in the Agreement in its technical review of the proposed Cosslett East operations as the agreement dictates “If the COGCC imposes any terms or conditions on Crestone’s operations that are subject to the Agreement that conflict with these BMPs, the more stringent requirement will apply” [Appendix A, BMP No. 31]. Accordingly, if any of the BMPs are more stringent than the COGCC requirements, such BMPs should be included in the COGCC permit for the Cosslett East site. Article III, Section 8, of the Agreement requires mailed notice be provided by Crestone to Erie property owners within one-half (1/2) mile of the pad site that would be affected by the proposed operation. However, notification was only provided after completeness review of the Form 2A in May 2022, per Rule 303.e, and not prior to Form 2A submittal, in conflict with the requirements of the Agreement. These property owners are currently affected by the proposed operations and are currently unable to plat or develop their properties due to reciprocal setbacks required under Erie Municipal Code 10-6-14 – Development and design standards to accommodate oil and gas wells and production facilities Section C.1.a requiring “Where a Form 2 or Form 2A has been submitted to the COGCC for an oil and gas location, but the oil and gas well has not reached completion, no external boundary of a new residential lot, structure that requires a certificate of occupancy, park, sports field, or playground shall be located less than two thousand (2,000) feet from the oil and gas Working Pad Surface.” Water Supply In the submitted Cumulative Impacts Plan, Crestone identifies 24,173 barrels (bbls) of water to be utilized for drilling operations primarily sourced from the Town of Erie and Left Hand Water District; however, Erie Public Works Department has not been contacted to request use of Erie Municipal water, nor has Erie Municipal water been allowed for use in Oil and Gas operations during the tenure of the current Public Works Director. Furthermore, the source of Erie’s Municipal water supply has been misidentified as “Ground Water” in Crestone’s submitted documents. In addition to the fresh water to be utilized for drilling operations, a further 6,270,000 to 8,170,000 bbls of fresh water will be required for completion. This is the equivalent annual water usage of 14,400 to 18,800 average Colorado households (50 gallons per day usage), the vast majority of which would be returned to waterways following sanitary treatment. In contrast, the 6 to 8 million barrels of water to be used in hydraulic fracturing will never be treated and returned to the waters of the State. Given the unprecedented droughts in the western United States, Erie recommends an increase in the use of recycled water utilized from the nearby Erie Hub, operated by Crestone/Civitas. Air Quality and Cumulative Impacts Beginning in July 2021 and October 2021, Erie installed air quality monitoring stations operated by Ajax Analytics/Colorado State University and BoulderAIR, respectively. The BoulderAIR monitoring station has recorded 12 instances of methane concentrations above 5,000 parts per billion (ppb) and 2 instances of benzene above 5 ppb since its installation. While recognizing that there are many potential emission sources in and near Erie, compositions of these recorded plumes are very frequently consistent with a direct oil and gas activity emission. Additionally, the 10 Ajax stations have captured via summa canister collection 16 incidents of elevated VOC concentrations whose composition was indicative of oil and gas activity emissions, including 4 where benzene 1-hour estimates were above CDPHE Health Guideline Value of 9 ppb. Five of these events were measured at stations adjacent to Occidental’s Papa Jo, Mae J, and Yellowhammer facilities, none of which were detected using the Montrose Air Quality Services monitoring equipment, highlighting shortcomings in the methodologies employed by the industry contracted monitoring techniques. These three oil and gas facilities are of a similar design to the proposed Cosslett East facility with similar BMPs in place. Three of these events were measured at a station more than 2,000 ft from any active oil and gas wells; however, on May 19, 2020, Western Midstream reported a pipeline release of an unknown volume of crude oil approximately 700 ft southwest of the monitoring station. Anemometer data and sample compositions are both indicative of this pipeline leak being the probable source of the 3 plumes detected. Given the demonstrated frequency and severity of air toxics detections within the Erie air quality monitoring network and the 151 active oil and gas wells (those with a PR, SI, or TA status) within Erie limits and the additional 295 wells within 2,000 ft of the municipal boundary already contributing to the poor air quality experienced by residents, Erie requests that the Commission consider the cumulative impact of additional wells on air quality and require mitigation measures as part of the permit. Furthermore, it should be recognized by the Commission that air quality impacts originating from state-of-the-art nonconventional “tank-less” facilities very similar to the proposed Cosslett East facility as well as crude oil gathering lines servicing those facilities have been observed and documented. BMP No. 3 in the Erie-Crestone Operator Agreement addresses Air Quality requirements under the Agreement. Additionally, Erie requests that air quality monitoring data collected from Crestone’s monitoring system be reported to Erie in real time. As noted above, Erie has measured frequent and significant methane releases. Coupled with other greenhouse gases which drive climate change, Erie requests the Commission consider the cumulative impacts of emissions from Oil and Gas operations on emissions and climate change. Data from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reported 276 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (MMT CO2e) in 2020 from onshore production operations (i.e. onshore production, gathering and boosting, natural gas processing, natural gas transmission compression, natural gas transmission pipelines, underground natural gas storage, and liquified natural gas storage). Increasingly frequent severe weather events and increased drought, resulting in horrific events such as last year’s Marshall Fire present a real danger to the residents of Erie, and increased oil and gas production threaten to accelerate and exacerbate warmer temperatures and climate change related impacts. Additionally, the recently proposed downgrade of the northern Front Range from a “serious” to “severe” violator of the federal ozone standards by EPA highlights the serious air quality issues facing Erie and other Front Range communities. Increased emissions from oil and gas operations hinder the region’s ability to bring ozone levels under federal health standards. Last summer, the region recorded 48 days with average ozone levels above the standard of 81 ppb, and stronger regulations for oil and gas facilities in the non-attainment area are likely. It is critical that should new facilities be permitted, that their contributions to ozone generation, greenhouse gas emissions, and air toxics emissions be at least partially offset through the decommissioning, plugging, and abandonment of older facilities. The OGDP proposes plugging and abandonment for only 2 existing wells, which have recently been temporarily abandoned and would likely be plugged due to recent changes adopted during the Financial Assurances Rules making. Erie requests that Crestone be required to plug & abandon all old, low-producing, temporarily abandoned, or shut-in wells near or within the Cosslett East drilling and spacing unit in an expeditious manner to minimize cumulative emissions of air toxics, greenhouse gases, and ozone precursors. Spill Prevention Over the past 18 months, there were 11 reportable spills/releases within Erie limits and an additional 13 within 2,000 ft of the municipal boundary. Erie requests that the Commission consider the cumulative impact of additional wells on the already frequent occurrences of spills and releases in or near Erie and require additional mitigation measures to protect residents. BMPs in the Operator Agreement that are relevant to Spill Prevention include BMP No 4 (Containment Berms), BMP No. 5 (Flowlines and Pipelines), BMP No. 9A and 9B (Safety of Discharge Valves) and BMP No. 13 (Water Quality and spills). Again, Erie requests that Crestone be required to plug & abandon all old, low-producing, temporarily abandoned, or shut-in wells near or within the Cosslett East drilling and spacing unit in an expeditious manner to prevent inevitable spills and releases associated with the aged and constantly degrading infrastructure associated with these older facilities. Sincerely, David R. Frank, Town of Erie LGD and Energy and Environmental Program Specialist
Comment Date:6/21/2022 4:40:08 PM
Subject: Please don’t do this
I am raising a young child in Erie. Please do not contribute to more air, water and land pollution with this project.
Comment Date:6/20/2022 3:41:38 PM
Subject: Say NO to these wells
I made Erie my home for about 8 years. I could no longer raise my children in such a toxic environment and packed up my newborn baby, my 5 year old and left. The industry has completely destroyed the town. Heavy industrial activity and residential communities are NOT compatible. There were two historic spills in the last two weeks in Erie, one was from a pipeline leak. It’s abhorrent that the COGCC is ok with allowing the taxpayers to foot the bill, both financially and environmentally. The residents get to deal with a water crisis, which we all know the industry destroys tens of billions of fresh water a year in Colorado alone. . An average of 12 million gallons of fresh water are used to frack a single horizontal well. I have all the numbers/gallons of wells drilled in Erie for the last 7 years. None of this water is recycled or reintroduced into the hydrologic cycle. Based on that point alone, why would you approve ANY wells to being drilled? According to scientists, 1/2 of the snow colorado gets will be cut in half in just 2 decades. This industry exports over 88% of all hydrocarbons extracted in our state. This is a number that Dan Haley, COGA President, boasts about. We’re not using the hydrocarbons, but we have to live with the consequences of a reckless and unsustainable industry. Wake up! You know that myself and others will blame you for allowing this to continue. We’re already blaming you. Your legacy will be the destruction of our planet. Shame on you. Say no to this financial and moral bankrupt industry.
Comment Date:6/20/2022 5:39:48 PM
Subject: Don Not Approve This Permit!
This location (with pads in Erie and drilling into Broomfield) will have a significant impact on residents in both communities; the three mile wellbores will require increased drilling time and higher pressures, resulting in increased risks of fire, explosions, and injury. Crestone Peak Resources used 175,534,674 gallons of water to frack the twelve wells at the original Cosslett pad in Erie. It is estimated that almost 300 million gallons of water will be permanently poisoned to frack the 19 wells. The cumulative impacts of drilling additional wells in this overburdened area have not been sufficiently addressed. The Denver Metro/Northern Front Range area has been designated a severe nonattainment for ground-level ozone, of which oil and gas extraction is a known major contributor. Per the EPA Environmental Justice Screening and Mapping Tool, this region is at the 95th - 100th percentile for 2017 Air Toxic Cancer Risk and the same for Air Toxics Respiratory hazard index. Oil and gas production releases carcinogenic VOCs into our air, exacerbating cancer and other environmental risks. With hundreds of nearby wells, including large-scale pads including Mae J, Hammer, Cosslett, Windsock, and Coyote Trails, the COGCC must take action to address the issue of cumulative impacts. The recent Broomfield Health Survey demonstrated that respondents living within 1 mile of unconventional oil and gas development (UOGD) reported significantly greater frequencies of upper respiratory and acute symptoms than respondents living more than 2 miles from UOGD sites. Other studies, such as the one published in JAMA, support these findings. Given the planned residential and commercial development in this area, allowing yet another large-scale extractive operation is not a compatible use. Clearly, there are multiple reasons to deny this permit: toxic emissions, millions of gallons of wasted, precious water, truck traffic and noise. Please live up to your obligations to "regulate" the oil and gas industry. And, finally, Please remember the Rule of the Seven P's: PLEASE PRIORITIZE PEOPLE AND PLANET OVER POLLUTION, PROFIT, POLITICS,POISONS AND PARTISANSHIP!!
Comment Date:6/21/2022 1:05:35 PM
Subject: Comments on Cosslett East Form 2A
Please find comments from Erie Exchange, LLC attached.
Comment Date:6/21/2022 11:41:29 PM
Subject: 402643220
Please do not allow oil companies to place more wells closer than 2000 feet from schools, senior living, recreation centers, and residences/businesses. New studies show that there is harm even over 2000 feet. I live in a city surrounded by O&G and have experienced so many ozone days that it's hard to go outside. When we moved to Greeley in 1988, the weather was great-blue skies and clear sight to mountains--not so today. This pollution leads to early deaths for seniors and is harmful to pregnant mothers. Enough is enough. Move wells away from inhabited areas. As it is, the state needs to consider the cumulative effect of additional wells.
Comment Date:6/21/2022 11:34:32 AM
Subject: Erie is FREACKED enough!
As one of the most fracked communities in the state, please STOP. We don't need more. Oil and Gas has more than enough surplus and is hiking prices to take advantage of the Ukraine and Inflation situation. 85% is shipped out of the state! Please stop risking our lives for this greed.
Comment Date:6/20/2022 3:54:56 PM
Subject: No to Cosslett
1) Cumulative impacts of oil and gas production are already evident and affecting air quality along the front range 2) We are in a state of drought and fracking each horizontal well uses between 10-15 million gallons per more recent company data. We need water to grow food. And putting more CO2 and methane in the air causes more drought in the West, further complicating our issues with fires. https://www.bizjournals.com/denver/news/2018/11/15/colorado-fracking-water.html 3) Extraction/Civitas have a polished look, but in reality, have not been able to protect public health adequately even with BMPs and after production. These facts affect future residential development and protection of wildlife. 4) We have prevented and prolonged transition off of fossil fuels in a way that puts all of us in a place of increasing natural and humanitarian disasters due to climate warming. It's time to act wisely now to move forward with mitigation, prevention, and preparation strategies, including helping the industry to transition by denying permits.
Comment Date:6/20/2022 10:44:23 AM
Subject: It's time to stop putting O&G into our neighborhoods
You have a duty to reject this proposal to protect the health and safety of the residents in Erie and surrounding areas from further deterioration of air quality, leaks, spills, and fire threats, and our nation needs to move on to cleaner sources of energy that do less harm locally and globally — climate change is real, and last year the residents of Superior got to learn that in the worst way. Please deny this permit. We need cleaner air and cleaner energy, not wells in the middle of cities
Comment Date:6/21/2022 1:01:50 PM
Subject: Please don’t allow this permit
Dear Commissioners, The 17 wells proposed for this Crestone/Civitas plan are not far from our high school & Soaring Heights PreK-8. Additionally, a neighborhood is being developed close by there right now, and the Town of Erie is planning for a business area right there too. Erie Parkway is currently undergoing major repaving project, and all the additional truck traffic to and from these well sites will damage the roads and add unnecessary traffic in an already congested area. We already have hundreds of wells in Erie, and our air quality data is alarming. We have legacy spills and leaking wells that have gone unremediated for nearly 1 year after discovery (State 30-6) and yet you want to allow 17 more wells to be drilled? Please do not allow any more wells in our Town.
Comment Date:6/15/2022 11:03:33 AM
Subject: City and County of Broomfield Comments on Crestone Peak's Cosslett East Oil and Gas Development Plan
June 21, 2022 Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission 1120 Lincoln Street, Suite 801 Denver, Colorado 80203 Re:City and County of Broomfield Comments on Crestone Peak's Cosslett East Oil and Gas Development Plan Introduction The City and County of Broomfield (Broomfield) appreciates the opportunity to submit comments on the Cosslett East Oil and Gas Development Plan. Broomfield has a strong interest in this application due to its status as a Proximate Local Government and its experience with oil and gas development in Broomfield. The proposed Cosslett East pad is located within 2,000 feet (ft.) of Broomfield's jurisdictional boundary. The closest Broomfield residences appear to be approximately 2,990 ft. from the proposed location. There are two disproportionately impacted communities (DIC), one in Weld County and one in Broomfield, each within 1 mile of the proposed pad. The DIC in Broomfield is located 799 ft. from the pad. Broomfield is concerned that the location, size and design of the proposed facility may adversely impact public health and the environment. We are particularly concerned with the potential for harmful air emissions to contribute to climate change, regional ozone, and adverse health impacts for residents living within one mile of the proposed location. We also have concerns with the amount of proposed water usage given the current drought conditions. Our comments below focus on recommendations for conditions of approval that we believe should be added to the plan to eliminate, or at a minimum, reduce these adverse impacts. At this time Broomfield has no position regarding whether the Commission should approve or deny the application but may reconsider its position in the future. The Location of the Pad Necessitates Robust Measures to Eliminate or Reduce Harmful Emissions Broomfield’s Health Study Indicates Potential for Adverse Health Impacts to Broomfield Residents within 1 Mile of Cosslett East The location of the pad underscores the importance of designing and operating the pad in a manner that will eliminate, or at a minimum reduce, emissions. First, Broomfield's recent health study indicates the potential for hazardous air pollutants emitted from the facility to contribute to adverse health effects in Broomfield residents. Broomfield recently released the results of a study on health impacts from emissions from five unconventional oil and gas well sites operating in Broomfield. The study was based on data collected from 427 randomly sampled residents, all living in separate households throughout Broomfield. The study collected data on self-reported health symptoms between October and December, 2021. At the time the responses were provided, three of the Extraction well sites were conducting pre-production activities and two well sites were in production. Broomfield's air monitoring system detected an increase in the frequency, magnitude, and duration of VOC releases during the time the health surveys were collected. Air quality events lasted, on average, for 3.5 hours and total VOC concentrations reached 23,000 ppb with a one-hour maximum benzene concentration reaching an estimated 223 ppb exceeding the federal, short-term Minimum Risk Level (MRL) of 9 ppb. These acute events were commonly associated with pre-production activities (drilling, hydraulic fracturing, and coiled tubing) at the United, Northwest Parkway A, and Northwest Parkway B pads. Composition of the air plumes revealed significant oil and gas influence and wind directions were consistent with activities coming from the three pads. Overall, 49 air plumes were captured in the fourth quarter of 2021 and over one dozen of these plumes showed benzene readings above the short-term MRL of 9 ppb. One hour benzene estimates during drilling reached 120 ppb from the Northwest Parkway B pad and total VOCs during the same event were 15,000 ppb. Other air quality events captured by Broomfield’s monitoring system were typically associated with onsite processing of hydrocarbon-rich drill cuttings (suspected from the “mud shaking” process, which is not enclosed) as well as the initial entry of the coiled tubing unit into a hydraulically stimulated wellbore. This study found that adult respondents living within 1 mile of the multi-well oil and gas pads reported statistically significant greater frequencies of upper respiratory and acute symptoms (nosebleeds, lung irritation, shortness of breath, cough, throat irritation, nausea, and vomiting) than respondents living more than 2 miles from the Extraction sites. Additionally, parents that reported symptoms for children living within 2 miles of the pads reported a statistically significant greater number of overall symptoms as well as greater frequencies of lower respiratory, gastrointestinal, and acute symptoms than parents that reported symptoms for children living at distances greater than 2 miles away. The results of the Broomfield study are similar to those in previous studies conducted in Pennsylvania. A key difference in our study, however, is that our study focused on exposure to emissions from multi-well unconventional oil and gas well sites whereas the majority of Pennsylvania studies evaluated exposure to emissions from unconventional natural gas sites. Larger multi-well sites that include oil extraction, such as the six Extraction pads in Broomfield, may increase cumulative impacts from exposure to air pollutants, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), than well sites that only produce natural gas. The study results raise concerns regarding potential impacts to persons living within 1 mile of the Cosslett East pad. Like the Extraction well sites, the Cosslett East pad is a multi-well, unconventional oil and natural gas production facility. In addition, there is another multi-well, unconventional oil and natural gas production facility near the Cosslett East pad (the Cosslett 22H-B168 pad which is home to 13 drilled wells and 12 producing wells). According to Crestone's application, the design and operation of the Cosslett East pad tracks closely to that of the Extraction well sites (i.e., multi-well unconventional tank-lite facility, similar BMPs to reduce emissions). It is reasonable to assume that emissions from the Cosslett East pad may be similar to those from the Extraction well sites. Accordingly, the results from the Broomfield health study suggest that living within one mile of large multi-well, unconventional oil and natural gas sites may increase cumulative emissions and additive exposure impacts from emission sources that originate from these sites. The proposed pad is within 1 mile of two DICs, 1 of which is located less than 800 ft. from the pad. State law and this Commission's rules recognize that individuals living in DICs may be particularly vulnerable to adverse impacts from oil and gas activities, in particular pollution. We urge the Commission and COGCC Staff to consider the potential for harmful emissions from the Cosslett East pad to burden residents living in the nearby DIC in Broomfield who may already be unfairly impacted by pollution. Cosslett East will Contribute Ozone Precursor Emissions to an Already Burdened and Unhealthy Air Shed The Cosslett East pad is in the Denver Front Range Ozone Nonattainment Area. This area is home to some of the worst air quality in the nation. The American Lung Association rates the air quality in this region as an F in its 2022 State of the Air Report. Currently EPA designates the area as a serious nonattainment area, but has proposed to downgrade it to "severe." Modeling conducted on behalf of the Regional Air Quality Council notes that oil and gas stationary sources are the largest anthropogenic contributor to the region's ozone problem, and the second largest contributor to NOx emissions. Ozone pollution can harm the respiratory system, trigger asthma attacks, and worsen emphysema. Children and the elderly are particularly at risk. Crestone estimates that mobile and stationary sources from the Cosslett East pad during preproduction will add an additional approximately 404 tons of NOx and 104 tons of VOCs and production emissions during the first year will contribute an additional 5 tons of VOCs and 2 tons of NOx. Notably, these are estimates. Numerous scientific studies have demonstrated that measured oil and gas emissions are significantly higher than estimates. A recent Synthesis paper, integrating several published datasets, found that U.S. natural gas emissions are 60 percent higher than EPA's Greenhouse Gas Inventory. One explanation for the difference between reported and measured emissions is abnormal operating conditions that are not reflected in average emission factors or standard reporting protocols used by operators. Accordingly, it is likely that actual emissions from the pad will be greater than estimates. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the Pad Will Contribute to the Climate Crisis Crestone estimates that preproduction activities will contribute 42 tons of CH4 and 67,147 tons of CO2 to the atmosphere. During the 1st year of operation, Crestone estimates the pad will contribute an additional 28 tons of CH4 and 2,095 tons of CO2. As noted above, these estimates likely underrepresent actual emissions. We are already experiencing the impacts of climate change caused by the release of anthropogenic greenhouse gasses into the atmosphere. Last August, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (“IPCC”) released its Sixth Assessment Report with stark conclusions that it is unequivocal that “humans have warmed the planet to an extent that widespread and rapid changes in the atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere, and biosphere have occurred,” and that “the scale of recent changes across the climate system . . . are unprecedented over many centuries.” The IPCC outlined the major impacts that we can expect to see in the West: Strong declines in glaciers, permafrost, and snow cover are observed and will continue in a warming world. Increases in drought and fire weather will continue to increase in the future particularly at higher warming levels. Projected increase in extreme precipitation. Projected increase in river and pluvial flooding. In Colorado, these changes are already starkly evident. The Marshall Fire in Boulder County, which occurred in late December and outside of typical fire season, was among the most damaging in the state’s history, destroying nearly 1,100 homes valued at over a half billion dollars and forcing tens of thousands of residents to evacuate. Local meteorologists and climate experts say drought, heavy winds, and recent warm weather created the atmosphere for the wildfire to flourish. And Colorado, as with much of the West, is experiencing these types of destructive fires in increasing numbers in recent years. Oil and gas sources are one of the largest sources of methane emissions in the state, in the US and globally. It is critical that new oil and gas facilities be designed and operated in a manner that eliminates GHGs wherever feasible, and otherwise reduces them to the maximum extent possible. Data from EPA's Environmental Justice Screening and Mapping Tool Data from EPA's Environmental Justice Screening and Mapping Tool further underscores our concerns regarding emissions from the proposed pad to negatively impact public health. EPA's Environmental Justice Screening and Mapping Tool is an environmental justice mapping and screening tool that provides EPA with a nationally consistent dataset and approach for combining environmental and demographic indicators. EJScreen users choose a geographic area; the tool then provides demographic and environmental information for that area. All of the EJScreen indicators are publicly-available data. Using the surrounding tract from the longitude and latitude provided on the Form 2A, the EJScreen tool shows data from a 16.5 square mile area where the pad will be located. The data from this area show elevated levels of toxic pollutants near the location. Specifically, the 2017 Air Toxics Cancer Risk (lifetime risk per mission) in this area is twice the state average and over twice the average for the EPA Region as a whole. The data also show higher levels than the average for the state for particulate matter (8.9 µg/m3 vs. 7.3 µg/m3) and Ozone (56.6 ppb vs. 55.5 ppb). Broomfield's Analysis of Crestone's Screening Level Health Risk Evaluation As part of the cumulative impacts plan Crestone submitted a Screening Level Health Risk Evaluation of Community Air Monitoring and Sampling Study prepared by CTEH. Broomfield staff reviewed the study and has the following concerns with its methodology and conclusions: The Screening Level Health Risk Evaluation report only states if air quality measurements were above or below Health Guideline Values. No statistical analysis was conducted from the air data that was collected. No health data was collected from nearby communities to assess the potential relationships between symptoms and pad activities and VOC measurements. The report does not state how many wells were in the phases of drilling, hydraulic fracturing, flowback, and production at each pad location. This matters, as the larger the number of wells on one pad, the more opportunity for plumes to occur, especially during events such as drilling (e.g. drilling 10 wells vs. 4 will have a greater impact on air quality). CTEH's strategy for real-time air monitoring “is like that used routinely by CTEH during chemical emergency responses at accidental releases as well as support of regulatory compliance at numerous sites in North America, including petroleum-related industrial facilities and their neighboring communities.” Broomfield asserts that monitoring during a chemical emergency would likely be different and have different thresholds and methods. The report doesn’t state how this is relevant nor how it validates the design and methodology of their study. The Screening Level Health Risk Evaluation report states, “Real-time air monitoring for each wellpad was performed for at least 48 continuous hours followed by 12- hour shift monitoring over the subsequent three days.” Three days of continuous monitoring data can show little to no difference in background if wind direction and meteorological conditions were not favorable to capturing emissions. Broomfield has recorded many three-day periods where our air quality monitoring system did not capture elevated emissions. All conditions must be just right, as well as in alignment (timewise) with said pad activity. The report did not explicitly state what the wind direction was during the time measurements were taken, rather the report states, “wind rose plots of wind direction and wind speed can be provided upon request." The report states that community air sampling canisters were deployed with 24-hour flow controllers. This will render a very diluted sample and can mask significant (but short-lived) air quality events. It is for this reason that Broomfield collects 1-minute air samples. Fluctuations in long- and short-term data over baseline is a critical component to comprehending actual air quality impacts. This report did not do that. Broomfield does not believe any of the conclusion points can be substantiated with the study design in the Screening Level Health Risk Evaluation report. There was no attempt to identify plumes originating from the pad and their chemical composition which is characteristic of oil and gas activity (e.g. i/n pentane ratios or with meteorological analysis). Thus, it would not be possible to state whether or not plumes originated from the pad and then migrated into a nearby neighborhood. Broomfield respectfully requests COGCC carefully examine the CTEH study and its findings in light of these comments. The Proposed Pad will Use Millions of Barrels of Water in a Time of Severe Drought Crestone's Water Plan indicates that completions at the proposed pad will require over 8,000,000 barrels of fresh water--in addition to nearly 400,000 barrels of recycled water from other oil and gas operations. As discussed above, the western United States is in the midst of a drought which is contributing to large and deadly wildfires. We are concerned with the amount of fresh water that will be diverted from surface and ground water sources for this operation. We recommend an increase in the use of recycled water to reduce the demands on fresh water sources. Recommended Measures to Eliminate or Reduce Emissions that Threaten Public Health and the Environment To reduce the risk of cumulative impacts from the pad and nearby pads contributing to adverse health impacts to nearby residents, exacerbating unhealthy regional ozone pollution, and contributing to the climate crisis, we respectfully request the following be required as mandatory, enforceable permit conditions to reduce emissions. The City and County of Broomfield prepared this list after reviewing Crestone's OGDP, Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission rules (COGCC), Colorado Air Quality Control Commission (AQCC) rules, and the requirements contained in the Operator Agreement between the Town of Erie and Crestone Peak Resources (OA). The list contains only those BMPs that are not proposed by Crestone or required by COGCC, AQCC, or the OA. Air Emissions Require electric drill rigs and line power. Crestone proposes to use electric drill rigs only if line power is available. We maintain that no drilling should occur unless and until Crestone obtains line power to operate electric drill rigs. Electric drill rigs minimize emissions of air toxics, greenhouse gas emissions, and ozone precursors. Prohibit venting during maintenance activities other than during emergencies or for safety. Provide notice to Broomfield as soon as possible of venting. Submit monthly reports of measures implemented during ozone action days. Report air quality monitoring data collected from Crestone's monitoring system to Broomfield in real time. Require monthly leak detection and repair inspections using an optical gas imaging camera or other approved technology capable of detecting leaks, if at any point continuous or high-frequency monitoring is removed. Note: Crestone proposes to conduct quarterly monitoring. Conduct a root cause analysis anytime a Grade 1 leak occurs, and submit the results of the analysis to COGCC and Broomfield. Require Crestone to contribute towards regional air quality monitoring conducted by an independent third party to monitor for cumulative impacts to air quality from the Cosslett East and nearby pads. Prohibit preproduction activities during ozone action days. Pipe all produced water off site and prohibit onsite storage or treatment of produced water. Odor Limit the emission of odorous gasses or other odorous matter to quantities that can be readily detectable when diluted in the ratio of one volume of odorous air to four volumes of clean air. Other Conduct at least two forms of leak detection/integrity management inspections in order to identify flowline leaks or integrity issues. Provide shutdown protocols with notification and inspection provisions to ensure safe shut-down and timely notification to local communities. Use rotary steerable unit that reduces drilling time on-site. Disclose hydraulic fracturing chemicals prior to transport onsite. Plug and abandon (in expeditious manner) all old, low-producing, temporarily abandoned, or shut-in wells in Broomfield to mitigate cumulative impacts and minimize safety risks. Notably, within the proposed drilling unit, there is an abundance of legacy oil and gas infrastructure, some of which have had repeated environmental infractions (for example the ALAUX F UNIT-61N68W26NWNW, Location ID# 321533)
Comment Date:6/21/2022 4:28:41 PM
Subject: Community Opposition to Cosslett East 22H-H168
We call on you to stand up for public health and safety and deny the Cosslett East drilling pad which is proposed in Unincorporated Weld County. You are duty bound to protect the health and safety of Colorado residents; we expect you to take action on this matter for the following reasons: -This location would put us all at risk. The three mile wellbores will require increased drilling time and higher pressures, resulting in increased risks of fire, explosions, and injury. -Crestone Peak Resources used 175,534,674 gallons of water to frack the twelve wells at the original Cosslett pad in Erie. We estimate that almost 300 million gallons of water will be permanently poisoned to frack the 19 wells at Cosslett East while Coloradoans endure continued drought conditions. -As required by SB19-181, the cumulative impacts of drilling additional wells in our overburdened area have not been addressed. The Denver Metro/Northern Front Range area has been designated a severe nonattainment for ground-level ozone, of which oil and gas extraction is a known major contributor. -Broomfield’s recent Health Survey demonstrated that respondents living within 1 mile of unconventional oil and gas development (UOGD) reported significantly greater frequencies of upper respiratory and acute symptoms than respondents living more than 2 miles from UOGD sites. Given the planned residential and commercial development in this area, allowing yet another large-scale extractive operation is unconscionable. Thank you, Sandra Duggan Colorado Rising
Comment Date:6/20/2022 1:40:19 PM
Subject: OG
Please do not sacrifice the people of Erie. We already have more OG than anyone else and we are finally starting to improve and progress. Those of us who live here want to stay and retain our health and quality of life. Please listen to the good people who already live here and take responsibility for our collective health and well being.
Comment Date:6/20/2022 6:52:46 PM
Subject: Deny Cosslet East Pad Permit
To members of the committee: I deeply oppose Cosslet East Pad project. I, like many of us, am grieving what we've already lost and are losing from environmental degradation and climate change in this state. This plan is a greedy money grab that will only serve to further destroy the future of Colorado. As a committee, you are required by law to protect our collective future, including our public health, safety, and welfare. As a Denver resident I am already regularly experiencing extreme ozone pollution, wildfire smoke pollution, and heat waves from climate change as a result of oil and gas production. The Cosslet East Pad will only worsen these circumstances in this state I love so dearly. Approving this plan will not help Colorado reach its goal of emissions reductions of 90% by 2050. If we miss this critical goal because of your negligence, what will be said of your legacy? The International Energy Agency and the UN Environment Programme have said we need no new oil and gas development if we are going to keep global warming under 1.5 degrees Celsius. Do not approve this permit. Sincerely, Rebecca Smith
Comment Date:6/20/2022 4:35:17 PM
Subject: I cant believe this is an issue in today’s political and environmental climate
I think it’s bold for the Crestone company to attempt to install another drilling project almost 5 years after one of their own projects literally blew up a home and killed TWO homeowners in Firestone, it’s bad timing to say the least and bad business to put it bluntly. This is ridiculous, audacious, absurd and incredulous that the same company would have the audacity to try to pillage more of our valuable planet to extract a finite amount of resources at the detriment of our air quality, water quality and potential life expectancy. I’d ask the people that died in the Crestone explosion in Firestone what their life expectancy was but THEY’RE DEAD! And Crestone did that. Crestone cut two people life short, for not reason other than the pursuit of profit over people. Anyone with a shred of common sense, even while driving a gas powered vehicle near the purposed site, would deny this project submission with extreme prejudice. Assuming you possess qualities like decency, rational and/or a modicum of concern for your fellow man/woman. I know I’m not the only Erie resident who feels this way and if anyone actually reads these and gets a true feeling for what the communities want…Crestone would be a blip on the horizon of failing companies with a bad business model. There is no need or justification for letting Crestone dot the horizon with fracking equipment to the detriment of our environment and the humans who inhabit these communities. Sidenote- “the Princely Family of Liechtenstein has staked a claim on Australia’s high net worth advisory market, offering almost $500 million to purchase local USB offshoot Crestone to form what is believed to be the worlds largest privately owned wealth merger” Let them go drill in Australia until they’re out of sand for all I care. They are not wanted here. Thanks for reading afr.com/companies/financial-services/Liechtenstein-royalty-backs-Aussie-firm-as-private-wealth-soars-20211215-p59hqp
Comment Date:6/20/2022 4:25:26 PM
Subject: Erie Is Not Willing To Be written Off As A Sacrifice Zone!
I strongly object to this proposal in its entirety. The adverse effects of climate change, driven by fossil fuels, along with the irresponsible waste of many millions of gallons of water used to frack a single well, cannot be ignored in our drought-stricken state. Moreover, it must be acknowledged that Erie has been disproportionately impacted by near-continual fracking operations, both within and outside our municipal borders, over the past 10 years. I urge the Commission to consider the cumulative impacts of those operations to our health, safety and welfare and to the environment and wildlife. At present, Erie is monitoring numerous production-related spills, soil gas plumes, and elevated VOC levels in the air we breathe. It is the COGCC's responsibility to prioritize the protection our our community, as mandated by SB 19-181. It is also important to note that Broomfield's recent oil and gas health study has now scientifically documented the impacts reported by its residents who live 1 and even 2 miles away from fracking sites; those findings are completely consistent with what Erie residents have experienced. It should be abundantly clear to all at this point that oil and gas cannot be responsibly developed in or near our densely populated neighborhoods. The proposed well pad is directly next to a planned major retail/housing project that Erie is counting on for future revenue and that is another significant concern. Toxic, heavy industrial activities are not compatible with thriving communities. We are already living with hundreds of active and plugged wells in our immediate vicinity. Erie is not willing to be written off as a sacrifice zone. No community deserves that fate. Please spare us from further harms by denying this permit.
Comment Date:6/17/2022 9:29:39 AM
Subject: Cosslett East
The proposed location is close to High Priority Habitat, the Little Dry Creek, the Stanley Ditch, ponds and fresh water emergent wetlands. Crestone Peaks has reported 19 spills so far in 2022. The spills are from tank batteries, flowline systems and off location flowlines. Prevention of spills should be the priority rather then clean up after a spill to best protect water resources and wildlife.
Comment Date:6/22/2022 4:56:41 AM
Subject: Do Not Allow More Wells in this area
The residents of the Front Range that have lived in Colorado for years are being directly impacted by the Oil and Gas Industry. This is not beneficial to anyone but the owners of the various companies and have an adverse impacts, especially on the older and younger citizens of our state. I get it that their employees enjoy the benefits of large salaries, but at what cost to their health? Our country, our world is being consumed by the fossil fuel industry. We are seeing many more fires, floods, and environmental disasters that have a direct correlation to the burning of fossil fuels and it is driven by greed. Please think of our children and grandchildren and focus on taking care of our earth, not destroying it. We have had the capability of using green energy for years and now is the time to move in that direction, not backwards.
Comment Date:6/21/2022 3:28:40 PM
Subject: Deny This permit
This location (with pads in Erie and drilling into Broomfield) will have a significant impact on residents in both communities; the three mile well bores will require increased drilling time and higher pressures, resulting in increased risks of fire, explosions, and injury. Crestone Peak Resources used 175,534,674 gallons of water to frack the twelve wells at the original Cosslett pad in Erie. It is estimated that almost 300 million gallons of water will be permanently poisoned to frack the 19 wells. The cumulative impacts of drilling additional wells in this overburdened area have not been sufficiently addressed. The Denver Metro/Northern Front Range area has been designated a severe non attainment for ground-level ozone, of which oil and gas extraction is a known major contributor. Per the EPA Environmental Justice Screening and Mapping Tool, this region is at the 95th - 100th percentile for 2017 Air Toxic Cancer Risk and the same for Air Toxics Respiratory hazard index. Oil and gas production releases carcinogenic VOCs into our air, exacerbating cancer and other environmental risks. With hundreds of nearby wells, including large-scale pads including Mae J, Hammer, Cosslett, Windsock, and Coyote Trails, the COGCC must take action to address the issue of cumulative impacts. The recent Broomfield Health Survey demonstrated that respondents living within 1 mile of unconventional oil and gas development (UOGD) reported significantly greater frequencies of upper respiratory and acute symptoms than respondents living more than 2 miles from UOGD sites. Other studies, such as the one published in JAMA, support these findings. Given the planned residential and commercial development in this area, allowing yet another large-scale extractive operation is not a compatible use.
Comment Date:6/20/2022 4:42:03 PM
Subject: NO MORE OIL AND GAS
Please no! This is way to close to a large number of homes, future homes, schools and future development. Air quality in Erie is already a huge concern. Who want to develop an area near oil and gas? The traffic over there is already horrendous. People are going to stop wanting to move to Erie and we need commercial development not oil and gas! I already know of families that chose not to live here due to oil and gas. Erie residents deserve clean air!
Comment Date:6/17/2022 3:06:11 AM
Subject: It's time to stop putting O&G into our neighborhoods
You have a duty to reject this proposal to protect the health and safety of the residents in Erie and surrounding areas from further deterioration of air quality, leaks, spills, and fire threats, and our nation needs to move on to cleaner sources of energy that do less harm locally and globally — climate change is real, and last year the residents of Superior got to learn that in the worst way. Please deny this permit. We need cleaner air and cleaner energy, not wells in the middle of cities
Comment Date:6/21/2022 1:01:14 PM
Subject: Please Don’t Do This
This Project is killing us !!!
Comment Date:6/21/2022 5:00:46 PM